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20121108
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rejected the mitt romney, john boehner solution for tax reform. >> what i will not do is to have a process that is vague, that says we're going to sort of, kind of raise revenue through dynamic scoring or closing loopholes that have not been identified. and the reason i won't do that is because i don't want to find ourselves in a position six months from now or a year from now, where lo and behold, the only way to close the deficit is to sock it to middle class families. >> now, that is the classiest way i have ever seen anybody say, you know what, somebody's got to pick up the bar tab, boys. this is what president obama ran against in the presidential election. mitt romney's approach to tax reform was, trust me. the american public wanted specifics. and president obama continued to give specifics today, but the economy wasn't the only thing on the president's mind today. earlier in the day, here's another development. ambassador to the united nations, susan rice came under fire from republican senators. senators john mccain and lindsey graham, back at it, trying to trump up the ambassador
house speaker john boehner told politico the day before the election about whether president obama has a mandate on this issue. listen, our majority is going to get re-elected, we'll have as much of a mandate as he will to not raise taxes. what do you say to mr. boehner and his supposed mandate right now? >> well, i think that he said that the election would be a mandate, it was, and he lost. and i think that the important point about the crystal comment is that there's now a wedge in the republican party that the president needs to exploit. there's a wedge between the realist wing and the kind of fa fantasy, childish wing. the realist wing understands the president has a mandate. democrats won the presidency and the senate. we won a majority -- we won the popular vote if you add up the house races as well. look, i think it's in both parties' interest to avoid the fiscal cliff. neither of them want it for a whole host of reasons, including it will be damaging to the economy. we learned recently that president obama in august of 2011 was kind of ready to do a nixon goes to china moment
after the election you had john boehner come in and say, look, we'll be willing to accept some revenue increases at some particular point. but like i said before, i think it's a reflection of how weak obama was two years ago, otherwise we wouldn't be in this situation. i think the republican party realizes that they were absolutely wiped out last week, they really do need to negotiate more. barack obama needs to stand his ground for once, he never has to run for reelection again and i do think we can get a conclusion that's not going to lead us to some horrible economic apocalypse. but that's only if the republicans negotiate and barack obama remains strong. >> okay. i'm going to ask both of you for your predictions. how long will it take lawmakers to come up with a deal? maria? >> i think it will take up until the middle of december. >> jason? >> yeah, and -- >> it'll be a christmas surprise for everybody. i think they're going to be until the last minute and they're going to leave at the absolute last minute. both sides will hold out to look tough. >> but i think -- >> a box of compr
is listening to their suggestions. up to this point house speaker john boehner is saying he will not accept any increases on tax rates. but some top republicans are quietly coming around. it is obvious after the election that republicans do not hold the mandate on taxes. while the g.o.p. still might not agree to a tax rate on those making more than $250,000 a year, if democrats demand a millionaire tax increase, it will be hard for republicans to say no. climate change actvilles are not feeling too optimistic after the president's news conference yesterday. advocates had been hoping the president would push for a carbon tax as a way to help raise revenue during talks on the fiscal cliff. while the president did say he is a official believe err -- firm believer in climate change and will take up the issue in the future. for now it will take a backseat to the economy. this is also an issue both parties avoided during the presidential campaign and even during energy talks, there was no mention of climate change
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)

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